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Cattery El Sham - British Shorthair Standard

Large pic of blue-cream Brit

A bit of History...
Roman soldiers brought the first cats to England. Centuries later, you could find their offspring in every street or alley in the UK. It was Mr. Harrison Weir, a cat lover who was regarded as the father of the Cat Fancy, who made the British native cat breed, the British Shorthair, popular in the late nineteenth century. 'The ordinary garden cat', he wrote, 'has survived every kind of hardship and persecution. That he exists at all, is tribute to his strength of character and endurance.' Weir's devotion to the British cats was supported Mr. Jung, one of the first Shorthair judges. Many cat lovers were encouraged by Weir's and Jung's enthusiasm and started breeding the British cats.

By breeding with only the best of these alley cats and dutiful micehunters the British Shorthair breed was born. The British Shorthair cats were very popular at the first catshows, but when the longhaired Persians came into the picture, their popularity declined. It was not until the 1930s that some breeders, among who Miss Kit Wilson, started to seriously work at the British Shorthair breed again and the breed slowly regained its popularity. Personality
To start with: each and every British Shorthair (or cat for that matter) has his own personality. Even litter mates can be quite the opposite in character. But still, let's try to describe their personality.
A British Shorthair can be independent and reserved but can also surprise you by acting as a little kitten - but only for a short while, they do want to keep their dignity. Dignity is very important to a British Shorthair. They do not use their voice like some breeds do, a Brit only uses his voice when it is necessary and appropriate. When they are out of food for instance. Food is important to a Brit too, perhaps the most important thing in a British Shorthair's live. They appreciate the company of us people very much but a British Shorthair can not be described as lapfungus. They like to be around, but not too overwhelming. And still they seem to be able to draw all the attention to them. They are extremely smart and they do almost everything for a treat, as long as they do not loose their dignity of course. British Shorthair are very brave cats and aren't afraid of whatever. They like their 'own people' very much and they don't mind strangers to be around, as long as they admire the Brit from a distance. It takes a while before a Brit knows you well enough to accept you stroking and petting it. They do not run away from you, they just ignore you and look the other way and as soon as you stop petting them, they'll start cleaning their coat excessively to remove all unwanted germs.
Body
Compact, well balanced and powerful showing good depth of body, level back and a full broad chest. Short strong legs, well boned and strong. Rounded paws. Tail short and thick with a rounded tip.

Coat
Short and dense.

Head
Circular and massive with round underlying bone structure. The head is rounded when viewed from any direction and well set on a short thick neck. Rounded forehead with a flat plane on the top of the skull. The nose is broad, short and straight. Firm, well developed chin. The muzzle is equally developed and distinctive for the breed, round cheeks. Medium-size ears, well furnished, rounded at the tips and broad at the base, set far apart, yet completely harmonious to the roundness of the skull.

Eyes
The eyes are alert and large, decidedly round, well opened, set wide apart and level.

Faults
Tail defects. Definite nose stops. Overlong or fluffy coat.

Scale of points

GCCF
CFA
FIFe
Head20 Head (30)
Head30


Muzzle5



Skull5



Ears5



Neck5

Eyes10 Eye shape10 Eye colour10
Body20 Body (30)
Body20


Torso20

Legs and paws10 Legs and feet5

Tail10 Tail5

Coat, colour and condition30 Coat (20)
Coat (35)


Length10 Quality, texture, length10


Texture10



Colour20 Colour25




Texture5
Total100 Total100 Total100

Self colours(not all of them, only the ones I might breed)

BlueBlue Brit
ColourLight to medium blue. Even colour and no tabby markings or white anywhere.
EyesCopper or orange.
Nose leather and padsBlue.
FaultsUnsound coats. Silver tipping to coats.
Withhold certificatesIncorrect eye colour. Green rims.

Lilac
ColourFrosty grey coat with pinkish tone.
EyesCopper, deep gold or orange.
Nose leather and padsPinkish.
FaultsIncorrect lilac colour. Tabby markings. Incorrect eye colour.
Withhold certificatesIncorrect eye colour. Green rims.

Chocolate
ColourRich dark brown coloration.
EyesCopper, deep gold or orange.
Nose leather and padsBrown.
FaultsUnsound coats. Tabby markings. Incorrect eye colour.
Withhold certificatesIncorrect eye colour. Green rims.

BlackBlack Brit
ColourJet black to roots, no rusty tinge. No white hairs anywhere. Rusty tinge permissible in kittens.
EyesDeep copper or orange with no trace of green.
Nose leather and padsBlack.
Withhold certificatesIncorrect eye colour. Green rims.

Cream
ColourLighter shades preferred. Level in colour and free from markings. No sign of white anywhere.
EyesCopper or orange.
Nose leather and padsPink
Withhold certificatesIncorrect eye colour. Green rims. Heavy tabby markings.

Blue-creamBlue-cream Brit
ColourBlue and cream to be softly intermingled. No blaze.
EyesCopper or orange.
Nose leather Blue
PadsBlue and/or pink.
FaultsTabby markings. White anywhere. Colour unbroken on paws. Unequal balance of colour.
Withhold certificatesIncorrect eye colour. Green rims. Solid patches of colour.

Tortoiseshell
ColourBlack with brilliant patches of cream and red. All these patches should be clearly defined and well broken on the legs and body. A red or cream blaze on the head is desirable.
EyesBrilliant copper or orange.
Nose leather and padsPink and/or black.
FaultsTabby markings. Brindling. White anywhere. Colour unbroken on paws. Unequal balance of colour.
Withhold certificatesIncorrect eye colour. Green rims. White anywhere.

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Copyright © 1996&1997 Suzan van Prooijen - The Netherlands
This Home Page was created on Friday 19 January 1996
Most recent revision on this page Wednesday 29 November 2000.